Cranbourne North family wants criminal who sexually assaulted woman in her home to be deported

Australian Immigration

THE family of a woman sexually assaulted as she slept in her Cranbourne North home wants the man responsible booted out of the country.

Family members have even offered to pay for a one-way ticket for South Sudanese refugee Lang Kouth, 21, who has lived in Australia since he was nine years old.

Kouth was sentenced to four years’ prison on November 29 after he pleaded guilty to sexual assault, aggravated burglary and theft, as well as unlicensed and careless driving.

The court heard a drunken Kouth entered the family’s home through an unlocked door, stealing a mobile phone and car keys before going into the bedroom.

There he took off his shoes and climbed into the couple’s bed, aggressively kissing and biting a woman.

Kouth then bolted from the home and stole the family’s Ford Falcon. He was picked up by police about 3.30am after losing control of the vehicle and smashing into a tree.

Speaking to the Leader after Kouth’s court appearance, the victim’s mother-in-law said the family was now living a nightmare.

“He’s got two years and three months, my son and daughter have a lifetime of flashbacks and trauma,” she said.

She said she had started an online petition asking that refugees and immigrants who receive jail sentences of more than 12 months have their residency revoked and be deported.

Under the Migration Act 1958, the immigration minister may refuse or cancel a visa on character grounds and nonresidents can have their visa cancelled if they have been convicted of a crime that carries a prison sentence of 12 months or longer.

The woman said her daughter-in-law had been left traumatised by the assault.

“My daughter-in-law … she woke up and just saw a pair of white eyes looking at her,” she said.

“We are left living in a prison in my house now; I was just out in the backyard and I had the door locked and deadbolted and my back door locked in case someone was able to sneak in past me.

“He’s not a kid, he knew what he did was wrong … he used alcohol as an excuse but you still know right from wrong whether you are on ice or heroin or blind drunk.”

The Department of Immigration confirmed Kouth was an Australian citizen, but would not speak further about the case.

Immigration to Australia

Liberty Victoria president Jessie Taylor said having different laws for citizens born in Australia and citizens born overseas would set up different classes of citizenship, which was not something Australia should consider.

She said Australian law allowed citizenship to be revoked if a person was found to be fighting with the armed forces of a country at war with Australia, but if it was extended beyond that it could lead to a slippery slope where any number of other people could be exiled.

“It is completely understandable that the family of this victim is angry and distressed, however, we believe that the proposal is not justified,” she said.

“Citizenship can and should only be cancelled in extreme circumstances.

“We cannot simply deport people who commit antisocial or criminal behaviour once they have become citizens.”

A Victoria Legal Aid spokeswoman said visas could not be refused or cancelled on the basis of a person’s nationality or membership of a particular cultural group.

“The minister must strike a balance between the risk a person poses, and the profound consequences for people whose visas are cancelled,” she said.

“The consequence for some will be either return to persecution or harm, or indefinite detention in Australia because they can’t be sent back.”

Article Source: heraldsun

Australia is at risk of losing migrants who are vital to the health of our economy

Immigration for Australia

Australia’s immigration system is at risk of losing public confidence, undermining its long running success. The government needs to make policy changes to put migrant workers and employers back on equal footing.

The successful “Brexit” campaign to leave the European Union illustrates the consequences of failing to properly manage public perception of immigration. Changes to the United Kingdom’s immigration policy were producing economic benefits and helping to plug gaps in the UK labour market. However, opponents successfully blamed the EU’s free movement of labour for increased immigration and various social and economic problems.

Australia’s situation is different, but there is weak regulation of the employers who hire migrant workers, especially temporary visa holders who are often susceptible to being mistreated. This is serving to marginalise migrants in the labour market and broader society.

Australian Immigration

Large intakes of economic immigrants have not led to major political upheaval in Australia. Aside from occasional spikes in support for Pauline Hanson’s One Nation, anti-immigration parties have failed to establish ongoing influence. Labor and the Coalition have supported expansive economic immigration policies for much of the post-war era.

The impact of economic immigration on Australia’s population, economy, and labour market is virtually unmatched. Since 1945, immigrants and their immediate descendants have accounted for over half of the nation’s population growth.

More than one in four workers in Australia were born in another country. The foreign-born population as a share of total population is higher in Australia than in any other OECD country, except for Luxembourg and Switzerland.

Australia’s immigration policies have changed significantly in recent years. They have shifted increasingly towards temporary immigration, focused on skilled, working holiday and international student visas.

Read More: theconversation

How many migrants does Australia take every year?

Australian Migrants

Just how many people move to Australia every year? It seems straightforward, but ANU migration researcher Henry Sherrell and Inside Story contributing editor Peter Mares find that it is anything but.

Towards the end of ABC TV’s special “Sovereign Borders“ edition of Q&A last week came an intriguing but frustrating back-and-forth about the number of migrants Australia welcomes each year.

The key protagonists were Shen Narayanasamy, GetUp’s human rights campaign director, and retired general Jim Molan, co-author of the Coalition’s refugee and asylum policy and Tony Abbott’s former special envoy for Operation Sovereign Borders.

As the transcript reveals, the two speakers offered up very different numbers for Australia’s annual migration intake:

At this point, UNSW law professor and refugee expert Jane McAdam intervened in an attempt to clarify matters. She suggested that the two figures could be reconciled: Molan was referring to Australia’s annual intake of 200,000 permanent migrants, while Narayanasamy was including an additional 600,000 temporary migrants.

Australian immigration

Neither of the two protagonists threw much light on the issue; in fact, the exchange probably only added to the level of public confusion, despite McAdam’s attempt to reconcile the figures. This was surely not the panellists’ intention. But combative, live television is not the best place to discuss statistics, particularly when they are complex. Counting the number of migrants Australia takes in each year might appear simple, but it is not really so straightforward.

All three panellists were correct in their own terms: Australia’s annual permanent migration intake is capped at just below 200,000 people (Molan’s figure) and each year around 600,000 migrants are granted temporary visas as international students, working holiday makers or temporary skilled workers (McAdam’s figure). Adding these two numbers together gives the total of 800,000 (Narayanasamy’s figure). But there are two serious problems in counting migration numbers in this way.

Read more: crikey